How to: Load a Trailer with a Forklift Bell Forklift Inc

Loading docks present the potential for severe accidents and have been identified as the location where 25 percent of all industrial accidents occur.
 
Feb. 15, 2013 - PRLog -- Loading docks present the potential for severe accidents and have been identified as the location where 25 percent of all industrial accidents occur. Each year, 4,788 accidents are reported as a result of forklifts falling off docks or other surfaces.

When a 9,000 lb. forklift rolls into a trailer that’s not secured, terrible things can happen. If the wheels start rolling, or the landing gear is damaged, that trailer can tip. Or worse, it can roll away just as the forklift is moving in or out. And when you consider that 9,000 lbs. of forklift is heavier than three cars, Forklift safety is no joke.

• Keep the forklift clear of the dock edge while vehicles are backing up to the dock.
• Do not begin loading or unloading until the supply truck has come to a complete stop, the engine has been turned off, the dock lock has been engaged and the wheels have been chocked.
• Do not drive the forklift into the truck until the bridge or dock plate has been attached.
• Do not drive the forklift into a truck bed or onto a trailer that has “soft” or loose decking or other unstable flooring.
• Drive straight across the bridge plates when entering or exiting the trailer.
• Use dock lights or headlights when working in a dark trailer.

For more information and certification requirements on this and other Forklift safety issues, visit us at http://www.bellforklift.com/training or call 1-888-404-2575
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