Glazeen-Improve Health and Safety with Glazecool 7779 for machining and Grinding Carbide

Chicago, IL – January 19, 2015 – Glazeen Industrial Lubricants shares news from the NTP, which includes their final report on metallic cobalt exposure available.
By: olive street design llc
 
 
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VILLA PARK, Ill. - Jan. 19, 2015 - PRLog -- Under the conditions of these 2-year inhalation studies, there was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity* of cobalt metal in male F344/NTac rats based on increased incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenoma and carcinoma in the lung, including multiples, and on increased incidences of benign and malignant pheochromocytoma of the adrenal medulla, including bilateral neoplasms. The increased incidences of pancreatic islet adenoma or carcinoma (combined) were considered related to exposure. The occurrences of cystic keratinizing epithelioma of the lung and of renal tubule adenoma or carcinoma (combined) may have been related to exposure. There was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of cobalt metal in female F344/NTac rats based on increased incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenoma and carcinoma in the lung, including multiples, and on increased incidences of benign and malignant pheochromocytoma of the adrenal medulla, including bilateral neoplasms. The occurrences of squamous cell neoplasms of the lung (predominantly cystic keratinizing epithelioma), and of mononuclear cell leukemia were considered related to exposure. The occurrences of pancreatic islet carcinoma may have been related to exposure. There was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of cobalt metal in male and female B6C3F1/N mice based on increased incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms of the lung (predominantly carcinoma), including multiple carcinoma.

Exposure to cobalt metal resulted in increased incidences of nonneoplastic lesions of the lung and nose in male and female rats, the testes in the male rats and mice, the adrenal medulla in female rats, and the lung, nose, larynx, and trachea in male and female mice. (Emphasis added)

One of the peer-reviewers, Dr. Terry Gordon, noted that the study complemented an earlier 1998 study on soluble cobalt sulfate (TR471).

Conclusions from the report were:

Under the conditions of these 2-year inhalation studies, there was some evidence of carcinogenic activity* of cobalt sulfate heptahydrate in male F344/N rats based on increased incidences of alveolar/ bronchiolar neoplasms. Marginal increases in incidences of pheochromocytomas of the adrenal medulla may have been related to exposure to cobalt sulfate heptahydrate. There was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in female F344/N rats based on increased incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms and pheochromocytomas of the adrenal medulla in groups exposed to cobalt sulfate heptahydrate. There was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of cobalt sulfate heptahydrate in male and female B6C3F mice based on increased incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms.

As you know, ILMA Manufacturing Members who market metalworking fluids are likely to have some products in the product line specifically formulated to be used in tool room grinding and to reduce what is sometimes called “cobalt leach,” an effect of some fluids that results in an increase of soluble cobalt in the fluid. While this study is focused on metallic cobalt (which can also be formed in the tool room setting through dry grinding), the findings of this report, in conjunction with the 1998 report, indicate increased risk to tool room workers resulting from cobalt exposure. OSHA has a PEL of 0.1 mg/m3 while NIOSH has an REL of 0.05 mg/m3 and ACGIH has a TLV of 0.02 mg/m3. ILMA Manufacturing Members products do not contain cobalt as formulated, but their use could result in the in-use fluid, if not properly controlled, to have levels of cobalt that could lead to exposures to workers in ILMA Members’ customer shops.

Hazard Communication Standard 2012 Update

In May 2012, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued the new Hazard Communication Standard 2012 (HazCom 2012), which aligns closely with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). OSHA now requires one standardized format for safety data sheets (SDSs) and prescribed wording and hazard symbols on product labels. Consequently, all Glazeen safety data sheets (SDSs) and product labels will be modified to comply with the HazCom 2012 requirements. Glazeen is committed to meeting OSHA’s June 1, 2015 deadline for shipping products with HazCom 2012 – compliant labels and SDSs.

Glazeen will phase in HazCom 2012 – compliant labels and SDSs between January 1, 2015 and June 1, 2015. During that period, you may receive some products with the existing label and MSDS format, and some with HazCom 2012 labels and SDSs.

Concurrent with the HazCom 2012 transition, Glazeen has decided to discontinue listing HMIS ratings on HazCom 2012 – compliant labels and SDSs. The attached memo summarizes the basis for this decision.

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