Finger Vein Authentication System

 
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CHESHUNT, England - June 7, 2017 - PRLog -- 1. What makes a good biometric? The search for the Holy Grail, the perfect biometric, continues. Every previously proposed physical biometric identifier has turned out to have issues of one sort or another — whether it be fingerprint, iris, facial, voice, hand geometry, ear shape, or the rest — each one presents us with a compromise at some point. But we must ask, what characteristics would the ideal biometric possess? Of course, to an extent, that depends on your application, but there are some fundamental properties that we can assume are desirable for all physical biometric identifiers.

These might be broadly grouped into the areas of security and practicality. 1.1 Security is the whole point. If you are not concerned about security then why use biometrics at all? There are two main aspects of security that our ideal biometric must satisfy:  Resistance to forgery. An "internal" biometric will by nature be more secure than an "external" biometric, since it will be essentially impossible to duplicate or modify.

https://www.premierelect.co.uk/biometric-access-control-f...

Finger Vein Technology – a white paper Version 1.0, 10/07/2007   Accuracy. A system that rejects legitimate users may be secure, but is certainly inconvenient. The perfect biometric will never reject an authorised individual (zero FRR) and never accept an unauthorised individual (zero FAR). Among technologies with the worst FRRs are face and voice recognition. Sometimes extraneous factors can affect the accuracy of a biometric method. A voice recognition system may fail to identify a user with a cold. A fingerprint system may be sensitive to dirt or grease or abrasion on the finger. An iris system may be affected by the presence or absence of spectacles. An ideal biometric will be as insensitive as possible to extraneous factors.  Cost. There will always be a compromise between the security a system offers and its cost. For example, fingerprint readers are now a commodity, low-cost product; however, they do not offer a high level of security. An ideal biometric will be "cost-effective", able to offer a relatively high level of security at a relatively low cost.  Size. Many security applications have size constraints, such as PC login or door access. The need to accommodate a large reader device (such as in the case of palm recognition) is a practical issue.  Enrolment. The more people who can enrol with our chosen biometric, the better. Some biometrics are less suitable than others: fingerprints can wear or wrinkle with age to the point where they become unusable; drooping eyelids can be a problem for iris recognition. This is particularly an issue for the disabled, where the chosen biometric may not be present, or bodily position may be an issue.


User acceptance. There are a number of reasons users may resist a biometric technique: Privacy concerns. For example, worries that it might lead to remote tracking. A biometric that cannot be read from a distance (unlike face, voice, iris) is preferable. Hygiene issues – applies to contact techniques such as fingerprint. Safety concerns. If my car starts only with my fingerprint, then thieves might chop off my finger. Fanciful? It happens[5] . 1.3 A compromising position All of the standard biometrics have issues in one or more of the areas listed above. A biometric that shines in one area will be a let-down in another.

Accuracy. A system that rejects legitimate users may be secure, but is certainly inconvenient. The perfect biometric will never reject an authorised individual (zero FRR) and never accept an unauthorised individual (zero FAR). Among technologies with the worst FRRs are face and voice recognition. Sometimes extraneous factors can affect the accuracy of a biometric method. A voice recognition system may fail to identify a user with a cold. A fingerprint system may be sensitive to dirt or grease or abrasion on the finger. An iris system may be affected by the presence or absence of spectacles. An ideal biometric will be as insensitive as possible to extraneous factors.  Cost. There will always be a compromise between the security a system offers and its cost. For example, fingerprint readers are now a commodity, low-cost product;
Advantages

Resistant to Tampering: Veins are hidden inside the body, there is little risk of forgery or theft

High accuracy: Unique and constant: Finger vein patterns are different even among identical twins and remain constant through the adult years.

Contactless: The use of near-infrared light allows for non-invasive, contactless imaging that ensures both convenience and cleanliness for the user experience.

Ease of use: Finger vein patterns are relatively stable and clearly captured, enabling the use of low-resolution cameras to take vein images for small-size, simple data image processing Authentication Speed: One-to-one authentication takes less than one second. authentication device can be compact due to the small size of fingers.
https://www.premierelect.co.uk/biometric-access-control-finger-vein-authentication-syste-c-31_315.html

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