Spanish Market Takes Over Miami

By: Miami International Auto Show
 
DEERFIELD BEACH, Fla. - Dec. 22, 2014 - PRLog -- Miami seems to be the most popular place now a days, especially for South Americans and all others from the Spanish market. With the Latin market exploding by more than 15% this year over last its clear to see the Latin Market is the new thing around the corner and everyone is trying to grab a part of it. But Ricky Lopez one of the partners of the Latin Toolbox says "The Spanish market is a huge chunk of vehicle sales that dealers are missing out on, Soon nearly 20% of automotive sales will be to spanish customers and we need to be ready for it"

Latino media hub

Crucially for coverage of the show, Miami is one of the prime media centers of the Latin American world.

Two Spanish language networks -- Telemundo and Univision -- have major operations in Miami. Telemundo is headquartered in suburban Hialeah, and Univision, though based in New York, has its biggest studios in Miami.

Jaime Florez, a TV journalist who hosts a weekly automotive talk show called "Ruedas" ("Wheels") on the ESPN Deportes radio network, said: "Miami being positioned like it is, it attracts a lot of journalists from South and Central America.

"The manufacturers are seeing in Miami the opportunity to introduce new products."

Media coverage gets auto shows noticed. Ford's Cabal said he counted about 100 Latino journalists at the Miami show on the Nov. 7 press day this year. Journalists are likely to attend if carmakers are unveiling vehicles.

"This show was the beginning phase of some wow factors," said Prestige Imports' David. "We're going to try to make it as big as L.A., New York and Chicago because South Florida deserves that."

This year the show featured a "Million Dollar Alley" of high-end cars. David sold two Pagani Huayra exotic Italian sports cars at the show. The midengine sports cars retail for about $1.6 million.

"The two individuals we landed at the show had never seen the brand," David said.

Hyundai took advantage of the growing buzz this year by staging the North American introduction of its freshened Azera large sedan in Miami, the first launch Hyundai has held there.

Jim Trainor, spokesman for Hyundai, said showing off the Azera in Miami was a good decision.

"We all know Hispanic buying power is booming," Trainor said. "There's a wealth of newspapers down there covering Hispanic news. We invite these journalists to our major events."

Ford's Cabal said Hispanics recovered from the last recession faster than the general population: "The Hispanic industry is up 14 percent year over year, according to Polk registration data. At the same time, the general market growth was 6 percent year over year. It's more than double."

Focusing on the Spanish market

"The South American buyer is coming here because their home market doesn't allow them to have these creature comforts," said David, whose dealership is one of the largest Audi and Lamborghini stores in the U.S. "They're people who left unstable economies: Argentina, Brazil, Venezuela, most of South America. They're coming from South America for a lifestyle that's safer for them."

David and other organizers of the Miami International Auto Show, held every November, hope to capitalize on the arrival of these well-heeled Latino buyers and several other favorable trends to make the Miami show a major event on the annual industry calendar. As the U.S. moved to restore diplomatic relations with Cuba last week, Miami was looming even larger as a potential hotbed of the car business.

Show organizers want to transform what was once a regional American auto show into the auto show for Latin America, attracting South American consumers and dealers to Miami. And Miami wants to ride its Latin American identity to join the top ranks of North American shows along with Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles and New York.

"We want to be one of the top five -- that's our immediate goal," said Richard Baker, show manager. "It's going to take some time, but we're going to head in that direction. We can be the gateway to the Americas."

Alvaro Cabal, multicultural communications manager for Ford Motor Co., said: "Miami is the so-called capital of South America. Whatever happens in Miami impacts the Hispanic U.S. market."

Luring dealers

to give Miami additional allure, the South Florida Automobile Dealers Association hopes to broaden the show's scope next year by adding a twist.

"We're going to pitch to all the trade associations and get the South American dealers to come here," said Baker, the show manager. "We're looking at different companies to put on South American symposiums to come up here."

That is a natural fit because some manufacturers, including Porsche and Audi, have their Latin American sales offices in Miami.

Often it's easier to get from one place to another in South America by flying through Miami, said David Burkhalter, spokesman for Porsche Cars North America.

"Miami is the safest city you could have for a hub from a business standpoint," he said.

Baker and the Miami show organizers will visit the Detroit show in January to urge manufacturers to consider unveiling vehicles that sell in Latin America but not in North America, a sure way of drawing dealers.

"We'll take advantage of our geographic location. It's geographically desirable," Baker said. "They speak the language here. They don't have to worry about speaking English here."

And there's an added element -- the fun to be had enjoying the shopping at the high-end boutiques and the clubs and restaurants near the Miami Beach Convention Center.
Luring dealers

To give Miami additional allure, the South Florida Automobile Dealers Association hopes to broaden the show's scope next year by adding a twist.

"We're going to pitch to all the trade associations and get the South American dealers to come here," said Baker, the show manager. "We're looking at different companies to put on South American symposiums to come up here."

That is a natural fit because some manufacturers, including Porsche and Audi, have their Latin American sales offices in Miami.

Often it's easier to get from one place to another in South America by flying through Miami, said David Burkhalter, spokesman for Porsche Cars North America.

"Miami is the safest city you could have for a hub from a business standpoint," he said.

Baker and the Miami show organizers will visit the Detroit show in January to urge manufacturers to consider unveiling vehicles that sell in Latin America but not in North America, a sure way of drawing dealers.

"We'll take advantage of our geographic location. It's geographically desirable," Baker said. "They speak the language here. They don't have to worry about speaking English here."

And there's an added element -- the fun to be had enjoying the shopping at the high-end boutiques and the clubs and restaurants near the Miami Beach Convention Center.

Information provided by http://www.autonews.com/

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Tags:Digital Dealer, Nada, Latin toolbox, Buscadordeauto, Ricky Lopez
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