Systemic Enzymes and Enteric Coatings

Enteric coating is a layer of protective coating for dietary supplements that is meant to allow the supplement to bypass digestion by the stomach and be absorbed in the small intestine.
 
 
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Systemic Enzymes
Enzyme Therapy
Enteric Coating
Exclzyme
Serracor

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• Supplement

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July 24, 2012 - PRLog -- With all of the controversy surrounding phthalate use, enteric coatings, and enzyme effectiveness, it’s critical that our consumers are familiar with our products, their ingredients, and how they work in our bodies. Most of our consumers are aware that we utilize enteric coating, but many may not understand exactly why it’s used. For orally ingested enzymes to be absorbed into the bloodstream, it must first bypass the acidic environment of the stomach and reach the small intestine. In order to accomplish this, the enzymes must be coated with some form of protective layer. Our enteric coating is not the only protective coating option, but we believe it is the best option. Comparing other enteric coatings side-by-side will prove why our enteric coating is unparalleled.
   First, what would happen if a supplement was not enteric-coated? Instead of reaching their target organs via the bloodstream, enzymes would be used for digestion of food in the stomach. Enteric coating is necessary, and it is imperative to know your options of enteric coating when it comes to systemic enzymes. One of the more common enteric coatings that has been in use for over 70 years is known as cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP). Although CAP is an effective enteric coating, it contains something called phthalates. Phthalates are a whole family of chemicals that are mostly used as plasticizers to achieve flexibility and resilience. Phthalates have recently become a concern, especially their use in children’s toys after their prohibition in Europe.
   Another commonly used enteric coating is known as hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate (HPMCP). In use for about 40 years, HPMCP is also recognized as effective. Although it may provide protection against stomach acidity, it is similar to CAP because it also contains phthalates. In a society that’s becoming increasingly aware of healthier alternatives, phthalate use can become the deciding factor when choosing systemic enzymes.
   There are two alternatives pertaining to enteric coatings that do not involve phthalates. One marketing company uses an “extra-thick cellulose capsule.” Although the cellulose capsule is recognized as safe and phthalate-free, this seems to be the only benefit. Cellulose is not an enteric-coating, but an alternative to one. There are no studies proving the effectiveness of cellulose capsules in protecting against stomach acidity. Only in use for about one year, its degree of gastro-resistance remains unknown.
At AST enzymes, we use a coating called Methacrylic Acid Copolymer (MAAC). This coating is not only a Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) food-grade product, but it has been shown by independent studies to be the most effective. Of all of the coatings we reviewed, this is the most gastro-resistant , which means it will not be destroyed by the stomach’s acidity. This allows the enzymes to successfully enter the small intestine and be absorbed into the bloodstream. Both the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have concluded that MAAC has no adverse side-effects in both public health and the environment.
   Besides being approved as an enteric coating due to its proven safety, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) also backs its safety. The EFSA is responsible for the original ban on 6 different types of phthalates in personal care products within Europe in 2004 – which sparked phthalate awareness in the first place.

ENTERIC COATING COMPARISONS:

Methacrylic Acid Copolymer (MAAC)*   
Contains Phthalates   NO   
Considered Enteric Coating   YES   
Studies that show Effectiveness as Enteric Coating   YES   
Gastro-resistance   YES   
FDA GRAS   YES   YES   
Time in Use   >50 years   


Cellulose Acetate Phthalate (CAP)
Contains Phthalates   YES   
Considered Enteric Coating   YES   
Studies that show Effectiveness as Enteric Coating   YES   
Gastro-resistance   YES   
FDA GRAS   YES   YES   
Time in Use   >70 years   


Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose Phthalate (HPMCP)
Contains Phthalates   YES   
Considered Enteric Coating   YES   
Studies that show Effectiveness as Enteric Coating   YES   
Gastro-resistance   YES   
FDA GRAS   YES   YES   
Time in Use   ~40 years   


Acid Armor® (extra-thick cellulose layer)**
Contains Phthalates   NO   
Considered Enteric Coating   NO   
Studies that show Effectiveness as Enteric Coating   NO   
Gastro-resistance   UKNOWN   
FDA GRAS   YES   YES   
Time in Use   ~1 year

*AST Enzymes uses MAAC as enteric coating
** Acid Armor® is a registered trademark of Arthur Andrews Medical Inc., which is not affiliated with, nor sponsors or endorses this product or any other product from Specialty Enzymes & Biotechnologies or AST Enzymes.

To read more about systemic enzymes, please visit:
www.astenzymes.com
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Tags:Systemic Enzymes, Enzyme Therapy, Enteric Coating, Exclzyme, Serracor
Industry:Supplement
Location:United States
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Page Updated Last on: Aug 06, 2012
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