Recovery of flood damaged heavy equipment part 2

The engines have faired much better but if you don't get them turned soon they will seize As the surface rust increases in the bores it is imperative that the engines are rotated only a couple of times then started a bit wet to prevent bore damage
 
Feb. 7, 2011 - PRLog -- Recovery of Flooded Heavy Equipment  Part 2 by Mechtronik

After the recent flood events in Australia Mechtronik technicians have been working flat out getting a wide variety of heavy equipment up and running again. Using the methods as described in the first blog on this subject see link – http://mechtronik.farmnet.com.au/2011/01/16/recovery-of-flood-damaged-heavy-equipment/  We have had a 100 % success rate. It has been 3 weeks now and the damage is accelerating rapidly from corrosion. We have seen some classic mistakes in the recovery process by others who will remain nameless. One instance was days spent removing the injectors and water from the cylinders but forgetting to remove the water from the after cooler which caused  cylinder lock-up when the unit was started. Result engine out. Also cranking the engine for long periods to remove the water thereby damaging the bore. Result engine out


The electrical system is copping it the worst. Depending on the design of the electrical system some systems faired better than others.

If the batteries were left hooked up any wiring that has a constant feed will have succumb to electrolysis by now as the system dries out. This can be seen clearly as a green powder around any positive wire.

The only fix for this is to remove the loom completely and lay it out and clean every plug – connection – switch etc. and  and replace any damaged wiring Even circuits that are not constantly fed from the battery have suffered damage due to tracking across wet connections.

Localised fires have started in control units with the battery hooked up as the machine dries out.
Some ECU's have suffered electrolysis of internal components and wiring connections. Dashboards tend to retain mud and starter motors are seizing by now.


The engines have faired much better but in the weeks to come if you don't get them turned soon they will seize As the surface rust increases in the bores it is imperative that the engines are rotated only a couple of times to squeeze out the water to prevent lock-up,then started a bit wet to prevent bore damage. Depending on the design of the exhaust manifold you need to ensure that the water squeezed out does not run into the next open cylinder. Loosening the bolts on the manifold can let this excess water out. After your engine has reached operating temperature replace your oil and filter again as any water trapped inside the engine will have mixed with your oil  


Call To Action

Start your recovery as soon as the water recedes Mechtronik specialists  are available now to assess your equipment recovery needs and produce a report for your insurance claim to proceed immediately or undertake the recovery repairs using our technicians . Call David Armstrong Mechtronik CEO on 0409641195 for heavy equipment recovery advice.
www.mechtronik.com.au    email mechtronikbz@gmail.com

# # #

Experience

Planned maintenance implimentation
Product support
Machine assesment
Technical support
Technical reporting
Equipment sales
Repair and recovery
Operations and logistics
End
Email:***@mechtronik.com Email Verified
Phone:0409641195
Tags:Heavy Equipment, Flood, Insurance, Salvage, Recovery
Industry:Construction, Transportation, Insurance
Location:Brisbane - Queensland - Australia
Account Email Address Verified     Disclaimer     Report Abuse
MECHTRONIK News
Trending
Most Viewed
Daily News



Like PRLog?
9K2K1K
Click to Share