1. Latest News
  2. Submit Press Release
  1. PR Home
  2. Latest News
  3. Feeds
  4. Alerts
  5. Submit Free Press Release
  6. Journalist Account
  7. PRNewswire Distribution

Research shows presence of Gender segregation in early Recruitment stages

Isabel Fernandez-Mateo associate professor at London Business School and her colleague, Zella King from Henley Business School undertook a study that revealed gender segregation may start in the very early stages of recruitment.

 
PRLog - Oct. 25, 2012 - Isabel Fernandez-Mateo associate professor at London Business School and her colleague, Zella King from Henley Business School undertook a study that revealed gender segregation may start in the very early stages of recruitment. This may be as early as the point when a candidate is to be put in a queue for the interview process.

Today gender discrimination is frowned upon regardless of the field of work. Which is why, this research clarified the mystery of gender segregation in short term or temporary positions. It showed that some recruiters exhibited to be following a pattern based on assumption of what were their Clients ‘Needs’ on previous accounts and related experiences. This was a method adopted to keep their clients loyal to them. The agency employees can undergo Human resource training and learn better techniques to sort candidates without gender segregation and at the same time keep clients happy.

The research aptly titled ‘Anticipatory Sorting and Gender Segregation in Temporary Employment’ collected data from a medium sized IT recruiting agency with 2,331 clients, 6,705 jobs and 23,355 clients for a duration of nine years.

The data was defined as ‘pre-hire data on the pool of candidates competing for each position’; it is not commonly seen data and therefore was vital in giving insights on how men and women are placed in different positions by employment agencies.

The inferences made from this data suggested that woman were more likely to be placed in positions that were lower paying roles compared to men who were generally dominating the high pay category positions.

Isabel Fernandez-Mateo said, “We did find evidence of gender segregation. When staffing firms are involved in a hiring process, women are more likely to be shortlisted for lower-paid projects and less likely to be shortlisted for higher-paid projects. By stark contrast, the client companies are more likely to interview women for almost all projects with the exception of some at the top of the pay distribution.”

The researchers coined the phrase ‘anticipatory Gender sorting’ which highlighted that as is normal to recruiting procedure the recruiters sorted the candidates based on the skill set of the candidate matching a particular position. On deeper investigation it revealed that there may be pre-set notions at play, when sorting occurred. Revealing that at the earliest possible stage i.e. pre interview stage the candidates had already been segregated based on gender. The pool of candidates for lower pay positions showed more likelihood of woman being put forth for the role. On the contrary, when higher pay positions were presented men were more likely to dominate this segment. With Human resource training employment agencies will be able to implement better practice in the future such that these attitudes may be changed.

For more information, Please visit: http://www.london.edu/humanresources.html

--- End ---

Click to Share

Contact Email:
***@mindshareworld.com Email Verified
Source:Jonathan Beth
Country:United Kingdom
Industry:Human resources, Business
Tags:human resources training, hr
Shortcut:prlog.org/12008445
Disclaimer:   Issuers of the press releases are solely responsible for the content of their press releases. PRLog can't be held liable for the content posted by others.   Report Abuse

Latest Press Releases By “

More...

Trending News...



  1. SiteMap
  2. Privacy Policy
  3. Terms of Service
  4. Copyright Notice
  5. About
  6. Advertise
Like PRLog?
9K2K1K
Click to Share