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Millions of Dollars for Art Works! Who is Buying? Need some sculpture?

Some art goes for millions of dollars. Some art is even hard to sell at a garage sale. This is about the incredible prices that people are paying for art. How much would you be willing to pay for a piece of art if you had the resources?

 
 
"Toujours L'amour" by Robert Barrows:  Bronze: $7500. How much for the original?
"Toujours L'amour" by Robert Barrows: Bronze: $7500. How much for the original?
PRLog - Aug. 27, 2012 - HOW DID THE MARKET FOR ART BECOME SO HOT?

WHEN ART WRITERS WRITE ABOUT ART, THEY USUALLY WRITE ABOUT THE NATURE OF ART AND THE WORK OF THAT PARTICULAR ARTIST.

RECENTLY, MOST OF THE NEWS THAT WE HEAR ABOUT ART IS ABOUT THE MILLIONS OF DOLLARS THAT ARE OFTEN BEING PAID AT AUCTIONS FOR FAMOUS PAINTINGS AND SCULPTURE.

WHAT IS IT ABOUT ART THAT MAKES SOME PIECES OF ART SO VALUABLE?

ARE ART COLLECTORS BUYING THESE PIECES BECAUSE THEY ARE GREAT CONVERSATION PIECES, OR ARE THEY BUYING THE ART JUST AS AN INVESTMENT?

AND, WHEN ARTISTS DO A PIECE, ARE THEY THINKING ABOUT THE POTENTIAL MARKET FOR THAT PIECE, OR ARE THEY THINKING ABOUT THE THEME AND CONCEPT OF THE PIECE ITSELF?

ONLY THE ARTIST CAN ANSWER THAT...

SO, HOW MUCH IS A PIECE OF ART WORTH?


HOW MANY YEARS AFTER AN ARTIST DIES DOES THE ART REALLY BECOME VALUABLE?


AND WHAT CAN AN ARTIST DO IN THEIR LIFETIME TO ENJOY THE FRUITS OF THEIR LABOR WHILE THEY ARE STILL ALIVE?



With these thoughts in mind, here are some interesting aspects of art and the prices for art, according to Robert Barrows, a sculptor in San Mateo, California.

1) "If you price your art very high, it may not sell at all. Then again, you never know." he says.

"If you have a piece of art that might not sell for a few thousand dollars, or even a few hundred dollars, you might as well price it at several hundreds of thousands of dollars because that way, people might think it is actually very valuable," according to Barrows, "and at least people may start taking a serious look at your art if they see a very expensive price…and who knows, it may be just the perfect piece that some rich collector might be looking for."

"It's like the prices for jewelry, says Barrows, over and above the weight of the gold or the cut of the diamond, what makes jewelry and watches so valuable?" It's all a matter of what people are willing to pay for something that may be special or unique."

2) "If you do price your art very high, be careful, someone might break into your home and steal it."

3) "Also, if you price your art very high, and you carry it on your books at those very high prices, you may wind up paying some very high taxes on it in some places,  and if it becomes part of your estate, your survivors may pay some very high inheritance taxes on it."
("As always, consult a tax advisor on these kinds of things," says Barrows.)

4) "In the event that you price your art very high, and you try to get insurance on it, good luck. Your insurance premiums could become very expensive" he adds.

So, how should you price your art?

How would an art gallery price it?

How much is your art worth now? How much will your art be worth later? And if you were a wealthy art collector, how much would you be willing to bid for certain pieces of art by famous artists or not-so-famous artists?" ask Barrows.

"A lot of that depends on your pocketbook, but if you were already one of those people who paid fifty to one hundred million dollars for a piece of art, and you had millions more to pay for future pieces,
how much do you think you might be willing to pay for some of the pieces you will see in the rest of this article?" asks Barrows…

AND, JUST TO MAKE THINGS INTERESTING IN THIS PRESS RELEASE…HOW MUCH DO YOU THINK THESE PIECES OF SCULPTURE MIGHT FETCH AT AN AUCTION?

"Before you send in your estimate, says Barrows, I will also give you a little pitch about each of these pieces to make them as valuable as possible."

First, a little background about the artist:

Robert Barrows is the President of R.M. Barrows, Inc. Advertising & Public Relations in San Mateo, California.

He is also the inventor of a video tombstone called the "Video Enhanced Gravemarker" (U.S .Patent # 7,089,495).
You can see more about it at www.barrows.com/invention.html.

He is also the author of an as yet unpublished novel called "Cemetery of Lies." Cemetery of lies is a collection of intimate, secret confessions, as told from beyond the grave, through video tombstones. You can read more about it at www.barrows.com/novel.html

He also co-wrote of a couple of songs called "Run For Office" and "Big Bucks." Both of the songs have gotten some airplay.
You can hear free clips of the songs at www.barrows.com/music.html and you can download them for 99 cents each on iTunes.

(Is the art getting more valuable yet?)

He has also had some poems and some articles published.

So now you know a little bit more about the artist.


Here are some details about some of the art. After each description, you are also invited to email a guess as to what you think these items might fetch at an art auction.

The estimates that you send in are not necessarily what you think you yourself might pay for each of these pieces…the estimates would be what you think the pieces might go for at one of those auctions where the bidders seem to have almost unlimited resources.

HERE ARE THE PIECES OF ART AND SOME BRIEF DESCRIPTIONS ABOUT THEM: (The comments and descriptions have been provided by the artist, Robert Barrows.)


1) “Toujours L’amour” (Love always)
http://www.barrows.com/tjl-red-1.html


"I actually started carving this piece to be a centaur. When it wasn’t looking like much of a centaur, I thought I could turn it into a sphinx. When it wasn’t looking like much of a sphinx, I turned it upright and voilà, “Toujours L’amour,” a celebration of love.

The bronzes of "Toujours L'amour" are priced at $7,500 on my website.

The original is in Alabaster."

HOW MUCH DO YOU THINK THE ORIGINAL MIGHT GO FOR AT AN AUCTION? (Please email your answer to barrows@barrows.com)

2) “The Girl Next Door”
http://www.barrows.com/gnd-1.html

This piece of work wasn’t always the girl next door. On the back of the piece is a title plate with a slightly different title, “Temptress.”

Rather than change the name of the piece, I left both titles on it. You can be both a temptress and the girl next door.

HOW MUCH DO YOU THINK "THE GIRL NEXT DOOR" MIGHT FETCH AT AN AUCTION? (Please email your answer to barrows@barrows.com)


3) “Adam and Eve”
http://www.barrows.com/adameve-1.html

A photo of the "Adam and Eve" sculpture by Robert Barrows has also been included in an Israeli textbook on love called "Love of my Soul.")

The nature of love and the nature of art is that it often starts out one way, and ends up quite another. Life is like that, too. It starts out simple and winds up complex.

HOW MUCH DO YOU THINK "ADAM AND EVE" COULD GO FOR? (Please email your answer to barrows@barrows.com)


And now,onto the next piece of art, and onto some more of Barrows' thoughts about the nature of art and the nature of love...

4) “Prom Date”
http://www.barrows.com/promdate-1.html


I could say that “Prom Date” is a special homage to young love and to a special time in one’s life…but that would be baloney!

The trouble with trying to read things into art is that it ain’t necessarily so.

I called this scrawny little flat chested thing “Prom Date” because it turned out to be a scrawny little flat chested thing, not quite the prom date I had imagined….but a lot of fun nonetheless…and the truth is, my real prom date was neither scrawny nor flat chested, and she was really quite a temptress, too. And even though she lived about a half a mile away, she could as well have been the girl next door.

SO, HOW MUCH WOULD YOU PAY FOR PROM DATE? (Please send your answer to barrows@barrows.com)

To see some more of Barrows' art, you can go to this web page and download a brochure  about some sculpture by Robert Barrows:  http://www.barrows.com/gallery.html.

On the lower right hand side of that page,  you can also download a brochure about a "Name this Piece" promotion intended for art galleries and art museums. It could also be used as a promotion for art magazines and art newspapers.


For additional information, contact Robert Barrows at R.M. Barrows, Inc. Advertising & Public Relations at 650-344-4405, www.barrows.com.

Photo:
http://www.prlog.org/11959286/1

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Contact Email:
***@barrows.com Email Verified
Source:R.M. Barrows, Inc. Advertising & Public Relations
Phone:1-650-344-4405
Zip:94401
City/Town:San Mateo - California - United States
Industry:Arts, Business
Tags:art auctions, art galleries, art dealers, art museums, art prices
Last Updated:Aug 27, 2012
Shortcut:prlog.org/11959286
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