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Celebrate Drink Beer Day September 28th with Chef Hora at Engine Co. No. 28: Cheers!

Save the Date! Chef Hora from Engine Co. No. 28 is celebrating National Drink Beer Day on September 28th between 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m

 
PRLog - Aug. 21, 2012 - MONTEREY, Calif. -- Press Contact: Marci Bracco Cain (831) 747-7455

Celebrate Drink Beer Day September 28th with Chef Hora at Engine Co. No. 28: Cheers!

LOS ANGELES, CA  -- Whether you call it Drink Beer Day, National Drink Beer Day or Drink a Beer Day, September 28th is all about beer.  While many Americans celebrate Beer Day every day of the year, it’s the perfect opportunity to sit back after a hard day, and relax with friends and family with a nice cold one. Of course it goes without saying - drink responsibly.
Chef Hora from Engine Co. No. 28 is offering an all day celebration!  Stop by between 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. and “Engine Co. No. 28 Drink Beer Day Small Bites and Flight” for $15 per person.

“Drink Beer Day Small Bites and Flight” includes:
•         Fried cheese slider, onion relish paired with Ommegang Whit
•         Flat bread, gorgonzola, arugula salad paired with The Brewery Trade Winds Triple
•         Beer braised chicken, dried fruit, crostini... Stone IPA

Want to celebrate at home?  Try Chef Hora’s delicious Braised Chicken and Dried Fruit Dish!
•         1 lb chicken thighs
•         2 ea shallots
•         1 clove garlic (minced)
•         12oz IPA
•         24oz chicken stock
•         1 cup dry fruit (apricots, cherries, cranberries)
•         2 Tablespoons neutral oil
•         Pinch of chopped tarragon


Directions:  Season chicken with salt and pepper. Put a braising pan on a high flame and add oil. Bring oil to high temp (not smoking) and place chicken in pan skin down. Brown on all sides. Add shallots and garlic and brown. Add beer and let reduce by 10%. Add Chicken stock and dry fruit and cover with foil and place in a 250 degree until the meat is very soft and coming off the bone (2-3 hours) checking liquid and adjusting accordingly. Pull meat off the bones and combine said meat with the braising liquid and dry fruit. Serve on a crostini and finish with chopped tarragon.

Here is some great Beer Trivia to celebrate September 28th:

What is the Most Expensive Beer in the World?
Answer: It’s called “Tutankhamen” and is prepared according to the recipe recovered by a group of University of Cambridge archaeologists in Queen Nefertiti’s Temple of the Sun in Egypt. It costs US $52 a bottle, and is produced in limited and numbered edition.

What country has the most individual beer brands?
Answer: That would be Belgium, with 400.
From what part of brewing did the term “rule of thumb” originate?
Answer: before the advent of thermometers, brewers tested the temperature of their maturing brews with their thumbs: too cold, and the yeast wouldn’t grow, too hot, and it would die.

Who was the first American to brew lager type beer?
Answer: The first US lager was brewed in 1840 by John Wagner, who had a small brewery in the back of his house on St. John Street in Philadelphia. Wagner brought the first lager yeast to the United States from a brewery in Bavaria.

What is Cenosillicaphobia the fear of?
Answer: Fear of an empty glass

Engine Co. No. 8 works within the parameters of classic firehouse ideas -- dishes that are satisfying and simple at the core. These ideas have evolved into a more light-hearted approach to making everything as good as it can be, embodying a new American fare and incorporating the flavors, colors and essence of California's bounty of products.

For more information:
Engine Co. No. 28
644 S. Figueroa Street
Los Angeles, CA 90017
Phone: (213) 624-6996
Fax: (213) 625-1600
Email: info@engineco.com
Web: http://www.engineco.com/

Engine Co. No. 28 Background:
Built in 1912 and with a construction cost of more than $60,000, Engine Co. No. 28 was the most expensive Los Angeles fire station of its time. Engine Co. No. 28 answered its first emergency call on July 23, 1913, and would respond to many such calls over the next five decades. The station's active service ended in 1969, and the building fell into disrepair over the coming years. In 1983, a 5-year preservation effort transformed Engine Co. No. 28 into its current blend of historic architecture and contemporary design. It is now home to a popular restaurant, Engine Co. No. 28, a theatre organization, and two renowned law firms.

Among the historic architecture preserved is the building's exterior brick facade. Unique features include street-level dual archways that once allowed fire trucks access to the building's two formidable metal doors, one of which is now permanently opened in the entryway. Spanning the second and third stories are two large Renaissance Revival-style window bays, and above these, three terra cotta cartouches portraying firemen's tools and the seal of the City of Los Angeles. Atop the original third story, twin towers crown a 14-foot parapet.
Inside the restaurant, much of the original architecture survives -- the red brick flooring, 18-foot pressed tin ceilings, and near the entrance, the elegant mahogany cabinetry that once housed the emergency alarm system. What is now the building's restaurant was then the apparatus room where the station's two motor-driven fire trucks -- a Gorham-Seagrave pumping engine and a Seagrave chemical and hose wagon -- were parked. At the time of construction, horse-drawn vehicles were still in use as evidenced by the large (and ultimately unused) ceiling brackets intended for hanging reining equipment.

What is now the building's restaurant was then the apparatus room where the station's two motor-driven fire trucks -- a Gorham-Seagrave pumping engine and a Seagrave chemical and hose wagon -- were parked. At the time of construction, horse-drawn vehicles were still in use as evidenced by the large (and ultimately unused) ceiling brackets intended for hanging reining equipment.
The building's original third story served as a private apartment for the fire chief and his family, while the second floor was used as a dormitory for the station's firemen. Three fire poles connected the living quarters to the apparatus room, one of which remains in the rear of the restaurant, providing a quick exit in times of emergency. In less hectic circumstances, a slate-step staircase was also used (a preserved section now leading to the restaurant's mezzanine). Much of the then state-of-the-art alarm equipment and its miles of wiring were located in the large basement, which was used as a practice hall for the fire department band in later years. At the rear of the building were a recreational handball court and the station's kitchen.

By the 1960's, Los Angeles had changed dramatically and so had its Fire Department. As part of a facilities replacement program and because of an agreement with the newly built Hilton Hotel (now the Wilshire Grand), Engine Co. No. 28 was closed.

The building continued to be used by the fire department as a credit union until it was finally vacated in 1971 and put up for sale as surplus city property. Over time, the building would fall into disrepair. Demolition seemed inevitable. In late 1983, Linda Griego, in partnership with Peter Mullin and Hugh Biele, began renovating the 3-story abandoned historical landmark into offices and a restaurant. The existing 20,000 square foot structure was expanded by 15,000 square feet which included a new fourth floor tucked behind the parapet. Project costs exceeded $5 million. Engine Co. No. 28's renovation has been widely acclaimed, receiving numerous preservation awards over the years. In 1988, at the time of its completed renovations, the building was recognized by the city as an historic-cultural landmark. 100 years since its original construction, and thanks to the preservation efforts of many including the late mayor Tom Bradley, Engine Co. No. 28 remains a vibrant part of downtown Los Angeles.

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Source:Chatterbox PR
City/Town:Monterey - California - United States
Industry:Event, Restaurants
Tags:los angeles, food, Beer, restaurant
Shortcut:prlog.org/11955367
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