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Donald L. Heymann & Co. says, "Sometimes It Pays To Be Ignorant."

I get smart quickly by asking good questions. People in general, and experts in particular, tend to have firm views on various subjects – including a limited set of words to discuss them – and these views haven’t been questioned in years.

 
 
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PRLog - May 2, 2012 - FAIRFIELD, Conn. -- I’m often asked to write about subjects I know very little about. But with my experience, this ignorance can be a blessing in disguise. Why would ignorance be a blessing? Because I have to ask very basic questions, and that can often uncover compelling new insights or an interesting way to position the “story” for maximum impact. As a professional corporate writer – a keyboard for hire – I get smart quickly by asking good questions.

People in general, and experts in particular, tend to have firm views on various subjects – including a limited set of words to discuss them – and sometimes these views haven’t been questioned in years. With a little honest prying, you might strike gold.

Metaphors like “striking gold” lead me to another reason why ignorance can be a blessing. If good writing is supposed to shed light on a subject, and if the writer is not “an expert,” he or she can help let in the sunlight – and a fresh breeze – by creating interesting and memorable associations. Metaphors. People listen and understand more when metaphors are used. And, by the way, understanding metaphors is one of the characteristics that make us human.

To support this point, subjects in one recent neurological study read metaphors involving texture – which stimulate the sensory cortex, the part of the brain responsible for perceiving texture through touch. Phrases like “The singer had a velvet voice” and “He has leathery hands” roused the sensory cortex, while phrases like “The singer had a pleasing voice” and “He had strong hands” did not.

But check out this other study. It turns out that the brain does not make much of a distinction between reading about an experience and encountering it in real life!

When study participants read sentences like “John grasped the object” and “Pablo kicked the ball,” their MRI scans revealed activity in the brain’s motor cortex, which coordinates the body’s movements. This means that words describing motion stimulate regions of the brain that are distinct from language-processing areas.

Even more amazing: sentences that described arm movement activated the arm-related part of the motor cortex, and sentences describing leg movement activated the leg-related part of the motor cortex.

Wow. Science is now substantiating the remarkable power of words. And that means a good writer can help you (and your expertise) enlighten and move people – from the inside out.

For me, the point is clear. You don’t have to be an expert to write effectively about a subject. You just have to know the right questions to ask – and maybe have the touch of a poet.

Visit: http://www.donheymann.com
Press Release by: http://coldfireinc.com

Photo:
http://www.prlog.org/11864826/1

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Contact Email:
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Source:Donald L. Heymann & Co
Phone:203.366.7525
Zip:06825
Location:Fairfield - Connecticut - United States
Industry:Business writing, Copywriting, Target Market
Tags:writing, copywriting, business writing, target audience, don heymann, adjunct professor, nyu
Shortcut:prlog.org/11864826
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