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As Witch Hazel Kicks Off Spring, Gardeners Still Need to Think About Deer Repellents

It’s recommended to apply deer repellent to your garden, even if your garden grows witch hazel. There are effective deer repellents on the market today that are natural and organic.

 
PRLog - Apr. 14, 2010 - As spring reaches its full potential, witch hazel appears center stage in gardens. With long dangling flower petals draping gardens, witch hazel harkens spring arrival.

If you have hamamelis in your garden, you’ll have found that it grows even though there is snow still left on the ground. A hardy deciduous, this large, vase-like shrub likes the sun, yet grows agreeably in half-shade. A cluster of stems grows from its short trunk.

There are many types, from the native Hamamelis Virginiana to a variety of hybrids, such as Jelena, Boskoop and Arnold Promise.

These plants are considered easy to grow. Best in a neutral soil, they will grow 12 feet high, with a spread as wide. They are often used as a large shrub boarder, a screen, or tall hedge. They are often planted at the edge of a wooded area.

Witch hazel is well loved because of its many uses, the fact it has no serious disease or pest issues, and one common misconception. Many believe these plants are deer-resistant. Gardeners plant witch hazel hoping to protect their garden. However, this is not the case. Any plant can become a meal for a hungry deer. There are no plants that are resistant to deer.

It’s recommended to apply deer repellent to your garden, even if your garden grows witch hazel. There are effective deer repellents (http://www.deeroff.com/advantage) on the market today that are natural and organic. Deer and other small animals have highly developed smell and taste senses to detect potential predators and food sources.  
The most effective deer repellents target both senses.

When choosing a deer repellent, check the ingredient list. A putrescent egg and capsaicin combination works the best. The putrescent egg mimics the scent of a dead animal, which alarms the deer because they think a predator is near. This causes them to flee the area. The capsaicin tastes bad and causes immediate irritation. The deer will stop eating when it tastes the capsaicin. Once dried, the putrescent egg and capsaicin combination is not detectable to humans, but is still powerful for the deer.

To be sure a deer repellent is organic, look for those that feature the OMRI logo on the label. The most effective deer repellents require infrequent reapplication, as little as every three months.

As witch hazel makes its spring debut in your garden, you need to still protect your plants from deer damage.

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Source:Cumberland News Service
Industry:Environment
Tags:deer-resistant plants, deer damage, deer repellent, deer repellents
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