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Artist Turns Dom Perignon Champagne Bottles into Molotov Cocktails for Controversial New Art Exhibit

Conceptual artist R. Lloyd Ming creates weapons as sculpture from Dom Perignon Champagne bottles to symbolize China's wealth and size as a crushing force against Tibet.

 
 
Chinese Molotov Cocktails by R. Lloyd Ming
Chinese Molotov Cocktails by R. Lloyd Ming
PRLog - Mar. 18, 2009 - NEW YORK -- "It was fun making that sculpture," says artist R. Lloyd Ming. "To collect the bottles I started a ritual at my studio. Each time I sold a work my assistants and I would open a bottle of Dom Perignon champagne to celebrate; however the meaning behind the sculpture is far from being a celebratory one." Ming's sculpture is made from Tibetan prayer flags in red white and blue, Dom Perignon champagne bottles, gasoline, and Chinese matches. The sculpture is called 'Chinese Molotov Cocktails' and it refers to the political conflict between China and Tibet. "The work reminds us that the Chinese Government is rich and Tibet is poor," says Ming. "It makes us consider that China's government is so big and wealthy, that there is little that Tibet can do to get the rights and freedom they long for. The red, white and blue prayer flags used as a fuse, represent American consumerism which has helped to make China rich."

As the show title of R. Lloyd Ming's show 'I Am Not Chinese' suggests; the focus of the exhibit is China and what Ming calls the tenuous relationship between China and America. His art works address many controversial Chinese issues including censorship and capitalism under communist rule, trade imbalance, human rights, pollution, Tibet-China conflict, America borrowing money from China, potential US-China war and the deliberate devaluation of the Chinese Yuan. The show runs from March 3, 2009 to April 3, 2009 at Studio C. - 55 West 74th Street - New York NY, 10023. The show is by appointment; Telephone: (212)362.3093

About R. Lloyd Ming
R. Lloyd Ming uses photography, video art, installation and sculpture to ask hard questions about society. He is inspired by artists who use found or readymade objects to create their work and Ming typically also works in this way. Notable influences are Marcel Duchamp, Subodh Gupta, Ai Weiwei, Fred Wilson, Haim Steinbach, Joseph Cornell, Louise Nevelson and Felix Gonzalez-Torres. Ming is particularly influenced by the work of American artist Robert Rauschenberg. Throughout his career Rauschenberg used objects he found on the street to make sculptures he called combines. As a result Ming refers to his sculptures as combines.

Current Exhibition: 'I am Not Chinese' - March 3, 2009 to April 3, 2009 at Studio C. - 55 West 74th Street - New York NY, 10023. By appointment, Telephone: (212)362.3093

For more info log on to: http://www.RLloydMing.com

PHOTO DOWNLOAD:
'Chinese Molotov Cocktails' - http://www.RLloydMing.com/Chinese_Molotov_Cocktails.jpeg

CONTACT: Jeff Martin or Lisa Zeng both of R. Lloyd Ming, (212) 362-3093

http://www.r-lloyd-ming.com

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R. Lloyd Ming uses photography, video art, installation and sculpture to ask hard questions about society. He is inspired by artists who use found or readymade objects to create their work and Ming typically also works in this way. Notable influences are Marcel Duchamp, Subodh Gupta, Ai Weiwei, Fred Wilson, Haim Steinbach, Joseph Cornell, Louise Nevelson and Felix Gonzalez-Torres. Ming is particularly influenced by the work of American artist Robert Rauschenberg. Throughout his career Rauschenberg used objects he found on the street to make sculptures he called combines. As a result Ming refers to his sculptures as combines.

Photo:
http://www.prlog.org/10199796/1

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Contact Email:
***@rlloydming.com Email Verified
Source:R. Lloyd Ming Studio
Phone:212-362-3093
Zip:10023
City/Town:New York City - New York - United States
Industry:Consumer, Lifestyle, Arts
Tags:dom perignon, communism, contemporary art, champagne, wine, weapons, china, tibet, freedom of speech, human rights
Shortcut:prlog.org/10199796
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